victoria memorial – pano stitched

This is a 1/100th sized version of stitched panorama image of the Victoria Memorial, Kolkata.

  • No. of images = 12.
  • Lens: 50mm f/1.8D.
  • Stitched & edited using: Panorama Tools, Hugin, GIMP
  • Original image resolution: 10480×3840 pixels = 40 MP.
  • Original image file size, format = 153.5 MB, TIFF.
  • JPEG Size: 36.8 MB.
  • Print size @ 300 ppi = 3 ft x 1 ft.

100% crop:

Below is a resized 28 MP panorama. These images were taken a bit farther from the Memorial.

  • No. of images = 8.
  • Lens: 50mm f/1.8D.
  • Stitched & edited using: Panorama Tools, Hugin, GIMP
  • Original image resolution: 9009×3124 pixels = 28 MP.
  • Original image file size, format = 80.5 MB, TIFF.
  • JPEG Size: 20.1 MB.
  • Print size @ 300 ppi = 2.5 ft x 0.9 ft

Click on the image for samples at 100% crop.

Backside of the Memorial (resized 56 MP)

  • No. of images = 11.
  • Lens: 50mm f/1.8D.
  • Stitched & edited using: Panorama Tools, Hugin, GIMP
  • Original image resolution: 13774×4064 pixels = 56 MP.
  • Original image file size, format = 160.5 MB, TIFF.
  • JPEG Size: 53.7 MB.
  • Print size @ 300 ppi = 3.8 ft x 1.1 ft

Click on the image for samples at 100% crop. The sample images didn’t cover portions of bottom-left corner. I filled the area with color of the foliage.

Clarity at 100% revealed even subjects which I didn’t notice while taking the shots. The clarity one obtains by stitching images is envy of any flagship camera. It is even better than widest lenses on medium formats.

For those interested, two things to note while taking sample images:

1. Shoot at A or M (so that the camera doesn’t apply its own exposure corrections). This helps getting images in same exposure, which reduces processing time (one can guess that for images as large as these; even a high-end PC can take about 6-7 mins to stitch just the panorama without enfuse/ HDR. Larger the resulting panorama and wider the exposure range in sample images, more would be the processing time and memory used).

2. Stand at one place and take all the shots of one panorama. This minimises alignment errors. While looking at a massive architecture, the scene changes if we move (thereby moving our eyes w.r.t. the subject); the camera must be considered the same way.

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